Charts

Charting Brett Favre’s 508 Career Touchdown Passes

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From 1992 through his retirement in 2010, there were very few Quarterbacks who were better than Brett Favre in the NFL. Over the course of his legendary career, the Pro Football Hall of Fame inductee and Green Bay Packers legend registered 71,838 passing yards and 508 touchdown passes. Not only that, but he was the NFL’s MVP three consecutive years in a row (1995-1997) and was elected to eleven Pro Bowls.

From Billy Anneken, this visual shows who caught touchdown passes from Brett Favre over #4’s career, which spanned 20 seasons in the National Football League.

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Over the course of his storied NFL career, Brett Favre threw for 508 touchdown passes. Of these 508 scores through the air, a total of 61 players caught them across Favre’s stints with three different teams — the Green Bay Packers, the New York Jets and the Minnesota Vikings. His scores were spread across to six different Jets players, ten different Vikings players, and 45 different Packers players.

The player with the most touchdown receptions from Brett Favre was Antonio Freeman, who found the end zone on 57 occasions. Freeman was originally drafted by the Green Bay Packers in the third round of the 1995 NFL Draft, and would spend time with the Packers from 1995 – 2001. He would later have stints with both the Philadelphia Eagles and the Miami Dolphins. Today, Antonio Freeman is a member of the Green Bay Packers Hall of Fame.

Here are the receivers who caught touchdowns from the legendary Brett Favre, along with how many scores from the Hall of Famer.

  1. Antonio Freeman: 57 touchdowns
  2. Sterling Sharpe: 41 touchdowns
  3. Donald Driver: 36 touchdowns
  4. Robert Brooks: 32 touchdowns
  5. Bubba Franks: 29 touchdowns
  6. Jason Walker: 19 touchdowns
  7. Bill Schroeder: 19 touchdowns
  8. Dosey Levens: 16 touchdowns
  9. Mark Chmura: 16 touchdowns
  10. Greg Jennings: 14 touchdowns
  11. Ahman Green: 14 touchdowns
  12. William Henderson: 13 touchdowns
  13. Visanthe Schiancoe: 12 touchdowns
  14. Tyrone Davis: 12 touchdowns
  15. Robert Ferguson: 12 touchdowns
  16. Keith Jackson: 11 touchdowns
  17. Percy Harvin: 11 touchdowns
  18. Edgar Bennett: 10 touchdowns
  19. David Martin: 9 touchdowns
  20. Anthony Morgan: 8 touchdowns
  21. Donald Lee: 8 touchdowns
  22. Corey Bradford: 7 touchdowns
  23. Sidney Rice: 7 touchdowns
  24. Laveranues Coles: 7 touchdowns
  25. Jackie Harris: 6 touchdowns
  26. Jerricho Cotchery: 5 touchdowns
  27. Tony Fisher: 5 touchdowns
  28. Derrick Mayes: 5 touchdowns
  29. Antonio Chatman: 5 touchdowns
  30. Berrnard Barrian: 4 touchdowns
  31. Don Beebe: 4 touchdowns
  32. Ruvell Martin: 4 touchdowns
  33. Chansi Stuckey: 3 touchdowns
  34. Mark Clayton: 3 touchdowns
  35. Terry Mickens: 3 touchdowns
  36. Mark Ingram: 3 touchdowns
  37. Dustin Keller: 3 touchdowns
  38. Terry Glenn: 2 touchdowns
  39. Leon Washington: 2 touchdowns
  40. Thomas Jones: 2 touchdowns
  41. James Jones: 2 touchdowns
  42. Ed West: 2 touchdowns
  43. Jeff Thomason: 2 touchdowns
  44. Randy Moss: 2 touchdowns
  45. Jeff Dugan: 2 touchdowns
  46. Noah Herron: 2 touchdowns
  47. Charles Jordan: 2 touchdowns
  48. Harry Sydney: 1 touchdown
  49. Andre Rison: 1 touchdown
  50. Koren Robinson: 1 touchdown
  51. Reggie Cobb: 1 touchdown
  52. Samkon Gado: 1 touchdown
  53. Adrian Peterson: 1 touchdown
  54. Kitrick Taylor: 1 touchdown
  55. Darrell Thompson: 1 touchdown
  56. Wesley Walls: 1 touchdown
  57. Greg Camarillo: 1 touchdown
  58. Greg Lewis: 1 touchdown
  59. Chester Taylor: 1 touchdown
  60. Naufahu Tahi: 1 touchdown
  61. Charles Lee: 1 touchdown

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Charts

How Much Teachers Spend on Their Classrooms in One School Year

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It was twenty years ago that the educator expense deduction was set, and today, tax time is always a difficult reminder for teachers across the United States that the deduction itself isn’t quite enough. The educator expense deduction has allowed teachers to deduct up to $250.00 for out-of-pocket classroom expenses since 2002, and the maximum amount has remained the same today.

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teachers-spend-classroom-year-chartistry

One of the major issues lies in that on average each year, teachers are spending an average of $750.00 of their own money for classroom expenses, which is an astounding three times more than they’re able to deduct around tax time. In the United States alone, teachers have spent about $2.8 billion of their own money, for their students, on supplies like pencils, paper, cleaning supplies, books, software and more.

A look at this visualization, found via My eLearning World shows the breakdown of how teachers are spending on their classrooms, with this pie chart broken down into six different areas. The leading area of expense is the non-consumable supplies, which includes books and software.

  • Non-consumable supplies (books, software, etc.): 23.6%
  • Class decor: 21%
  • Consumable supplies (pencils, paper, etc.): 17.4%
  • Food & snacks: 14.8%
  • Prizes: 14.6%
  • Cleaning supplies: 8.6%

Teacher salaries have not been keeping up with inflation either. Since 2015 alone, the spending on classroom supplies for teachers has increased approximately 25%, yet they’re still only able to deduct $250.00 at maximum at tax time. Some have even said that the cost of classroom supplies is $250.00 each month.

Per NPR, it’s reported that about 55% of those who are still teaching as a profession are strongly considering leaving the career behind for something else, much sooner than they had originally planned to. With an estimated 567,000 less teachers than there were prior to the COVID-19 pandemic hit, the shortage of educators in the United States is alarming, but perhaps with good reason.

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Charts

The Oldest Businesses in the United States

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Across America, there are many businesses still in operation that are older than the Declaration of Independence! Since the dawn of the United States, establishing a business to serve the people and make a living has been a cornerstone of the American spirit. This fascinating chart created by the team at Wyoming Trust & LLC Attorney is a celebration of the pioneering backbone of the the United States:

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oldest-businesses-us-chartistry

Did you know that the Jim Beam Distillery has been in operation since George Washington was president? It was established in 1975, making it the oldest business in Kentucky. That’s why I love gathering content to share with Chartistry; you get to learn all sorts of obscure trivia!

The oldest business in the United States that is still operational is the Shirley Plantation in Charles City, Virginia. The grounds were first established in 1613 by English merchant and politician Sir Thomas West, 3rd Baron De La Warr. Here is another fun fact about the baron; the bay, river, a Native American people, and a U.S. state were all named “Delaware” after him.

The second oldest business in America is Tuttle’s Red Barn in Dover, New Hampshire, established in 1632. There are claims that it is the oldest known family-owned farm in America, but this has been challenged. It has been passed down across eleven generations since John Tuttle arrived in the New World with a land grant from Charles II of England. It was originally 20 acres, but it expanded to its peak of 240 acres during the 20th century. Nowadays, the farm’s largest crop is sweet corn.

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Charts

Which State Has The Highest and the Lowest Rate of Boat Ownership?

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Where in the United States do you think you would find the highest rate of boats per capita? If you guessed Minnesota, you would be correct! According to SIYachts.com’s chart ‘Which U.S. State has the Most Recreational Boats & Yachts per Capita?’, there are 143.6 boats and yachts per 1,000 people in Minnesota. The state boasts the most named lakes in the country with 15,291 natural lakes; 11,824 of which are larger than 10 acres making them a great option to boat on. Due to the vast number of lakes across the state, Minnesota is known as the Land of 10,000 Lakes. Wisconsin has almost as many lakes as Minnesota with 15,074; although only 6,044 of the lakes are named. A lake is commonly left unnamed if it is too tiny, a farm pond, or a minor lake in a remote area.

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highest-rate-boat-ownership-chartistry

On the flip side, which state do you think would have the lowest rate of boats and yachts per capita? You may be surprised to find that Hawaii ranked last in the nation with a rate of 8.5 boats and yachts per 1,000 people. Minnesota’s rate per capita is seventeen times the rate in Hawaii! Why is the rate so low in a state that is surrounded by water? Apparently a lack of support for the industry and its necessary infrastructure is to blame. Hawaii’s limited number of marinas are small in size, and many are in need of repair. This has led to a high cost for storing boats on land, another deterrent to the state’s boating industry. Which states were you surprised to see had such a high, or low, rate of boat ownership?

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