Misc Visuals

The Ultimate Guide to Sailing Knots

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One of the most important skills to learn as a sailor is the art of knot tying. Knots can be used for so many things across the board. Fishing, crabbing, mooring, docking, sailing, anchoring and even saving lives on the water, just to name a few. A good knot verses a poorly tied knot could mean the difference of your boat floating away in the middle of the night or staying safely secured to the dock or mooring. This visual guide from the team at SeattleYachts.com illustrates 16 of most commonly used boat knots in the nautical world.

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The half hitch is the first knot represented on the guide and it is touted as the quickest and easiest knot in the boating and sailing world. It is commonly the start of many other knots, like the double half hitch which is a more secure version its original. This knot can help keep boats securely tied to their docks without worry of slippage. The anchor hitch is another important knot represented on this graph. All boats need to use an anchor from time to time and this knot is made to hold heavy loads and also stay tight when there is slack in the line. Knowing the basics of knot tying is also a good survival skill to have. Knots can be used in shelter building, fishing and foraging for food, and even lassos like the bowline, which can be thrown into the water to help save someone who can’t swim. Try your hand at some of these sailboat knots on this visualization and see how your skills compare.

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Misc Visuals

How 33 Colors Got Their Names

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As both a color lover and a word origins enthusiast, I was thrilled to discover this vibrant chart called “how colors got their names” while browsing r/coolguides! It was created by Adam Aleksic who goes by @etymologynerd on Instagram and etyomology_nerd on Twitter (I still refuse to call it X). He also has a website where provides an incredible interactive world map where you can learn about how any country got its name!

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This splashy guide caught my eye at first because it reminds me of how professional colored markers are displayed at craft stores. The name origin for crimson sparked some intrigue because it states that it is from a Persian word meaning “worm-colored” in reference to how it was made. Vermillion, another red hue, means “small worm” in Latin. So how were these pigments made originally? Turns out it has nothing to do with worms but rather a scale insect called Kermes vermilio. Ancient Egyptians, Mesopotamians, Indians, Greeks, Romans, and Iranians crushed the dried bodies of these insects into a richly pigmented red dye.

Here is a fun little nugget of trivia from the comment section by pshokoohi: “Fun fact, in Pharsi, when we refer to someone as “khaki” it generally means they’re “down to earth.”” The word Khaki traces to the Persian word khak, meaning “dusty” or “earth-colored”. I would absolutely love to see another guide like this with entirely different colors! Here are a few I got curious about:

Yellow: “The word yellow is from the Old English geolu, geolwe (oblique case), meaning “yellow, and yellowish”, derived from the Proto-Germanic word gelwaz “yellow”. It has the same Indo-European base, gel-, as the words gold and yell; gʰel- means both bright and gleaming, and to cry out.”

Green: “From Middle English grene, from Old English grēne, from Proto-West Germanic *grōnī, from Proto-Germanic *grōniz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰreh₁- (“to grow”).”

Pink: “The color pink is named after the flowers, pinks,[7] flowering plants in the genus Dianthus, and derives from the frilled edge of the flowers. The verb “to pink” dates from the 14th century and means “to decorate with a perforated or punched pattern” (possibly from German picken, “to peck”).”

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All The Brands Owned By PepsiCo

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When we think of PepsiCo, the first thing that comes to our mind are the drinks Pepsi, Diet Pepsi, or Mountain Dew. However, did you know that PepsiCo also owns food products and beverages other than soda? On this infographic by LLCAttorney.com, let’s list down some of the famous products owned by PepsiCo while also diving into its history.

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Moving on to some of the well-known brands owned by PepsiCo, famous drinks include Aquafina, Lipton, Mountain Dew, and more. Regarding the food sector, Lay’s, Doritos, and SunChips are only some of the brands that PepsiCo owns. In this list, many brands are not fully owned by PepsiCo. Certain brands have a specific product license or are distributed by PepsiCo in different markets.

Looking back, PepsiCo has a very famous and exciting history. Founded in 1898 and later going bankrupt, the recipe of PepsiCo was bought by Wall Street brokers in 1931. In 1965, the Pepsi-Cola name was officially changed to PepsiCo, which we now know. In 1970, the company moved its headquarters to New York, where it remains.

When talking about competitors to PepsiCo, Coca-Cola immediately comes to mind. The two brands have engaged in the “cola wars” since 1970. When looking at the marketing campaigns and products, we can see many similarities between the two brands. Both introduced merchandise like t-shirts or jackets. Both have launched famous commercials by celebrities and have similar-tasting beverages. Although we can draw many similarities between the two, neither brand shows any signs of slowing down.

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How Many Companies Does Elon Musk Own?

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Elon Musk has become the richest person in the world thanks to his many investments in the tech world, but how many companies does he actually own? As of late summer 2023 Musk is running six different companies, including his newest venture xAI. His newest company is, as the name suggests, an Artificial Intelligence company that he founded in July 2023. He created this new company to be a rival to the creator of ChatGPT, OpenAI. Interestingly enough OpenAI is one of the companies that Elon Musk used to own, according to this chart created by Madison Trust Company.

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Their chart, entitled ‘Everything Elon Musk Owns’, has the six companies Elon Musk currently owns and the four companies he no longer has any stake in. It paints a descriptive picture of Elon Musk’s rise to incredible wealth through the buying and selling of various tech companies since 1995. His rise to wealth started with creating online business directory Zip2, which he sold for $307 million after four years. His first big payday came from the $1.5 billion sale of PayPal to eBay in 2002. From there Musk invested in space transportation with SpaceX and electric vehicles with Tesla, both of which are valued at hundreds of billions of dollars today. But Elon Musk didn’t stop there. He has also founded or invested in solar energy, AI research, underground tunnels, and even implantable brain-computer interfaces. Elon Musk’s business interests are quite broad-ranging; it will be interesting to see what kind of technologies he invests in next.

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