Misc Visuals

The Ultimate Visual Guide to Boy Scout Patches and What They Mean

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The Boy Scouts of America was established in 1910 – ever since, invaluable qualities such as integrity, courage, teamwork, and survival skills have been cultivated and challenged in the youths who join. Boy Scouts can earn a myriad of patches that represent their achievements, ranging from simple colored shoulder loops to indicate the level of scouting the Scout has reached to individual merit badges in skills such as swimming, first aid, environmental science, archery, communication, citizenship in the community, wood carving, and even family life! One thing I love about patches of all kinds is how they translate a broader concept into a small design, much like logos! The team at WizardPins.com has created this fantastic visual guide to Boy Scout patches and what they mean:

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There are so many cool designs on here! I am especially fond of the Wood Carving, Camping, and Arrow of Light patches. There are over 135 merit badges that Scouts can earn. How are Boy Scout patches earned? For merit badges, a scout must complete requirements with their badge counselor that help demonstrate a skillful understanding of the badge’s subject. For example, in order to earn a Hiking merit badge, the Scout must take four 10-mile hikes and one 20-mile hike with written plans and follow-up reports. I am actually shocked that a 20-mile hike is necessary – that is a colossal challenge even for a well-seasoned adult! It even says that Scouts are permitted to stop for just one meal. Goodness gracious! Way to go, Boy Scouts.

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Charts

How Many Crayola Crayon Colors Are There? A Lot.

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This may be the most colorful visualization of history we’ve ever seen! This chart shows every single color of Crayola crayon ever made. Given the company’s long history, that’s an impressive and long list of colors! Over the years they’ve made many special and limited editions sets of crayons, so you may not have realized that the company has made over 400 crayon colors. And yet, it’s true! Since the first set of crayons was made back in 1903 with a simple set of 8 colors, the company has become a childhood staple and experimented with all kinds of different colors, styles, and twists on the wax crayon. You can see it for yourself on the visualization:

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Scanning over these colors is a real trip down memory lane. Crayola doesn’t have all these colors in circulation anymore. You might remember glitter crayons from childhood or the neon set. Or what about scented crayons that smelled good enough to eat? Many people feel nostalgic over the smell of Crayola’s which comes from a substance called stearic acid, which is derived from beef fat. Unfortunately, you can’t buy every color in the graph fresh and new (though plenty of people sell them used for collectors.) Crayola does sell a huge set of 120 crayons for a well-rounded set of what they offer. Only the most avid collectors might experience all 400 colors, but we can come close with the colorful visual of the long history of Crayola!

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Misc Visuals

Everything the Luxury Giant LVMH Owns in One Chart

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Today I learned that LVMH is Louis Vuitton’s parent company. Moët Hennessy Louis Vuitton (LVMH for short) is a luxury goods conglomerate originally born from the merging of the very luxury goods that are its namesake. However, Moët, Hennessy, and Louis Vuitton are just the start. The company owns a multitude of luxury goods in a variety of different categories including fashion and leather goods, wines and spirits, perfume and cosmetics, retailers, watches and jewelry and more. This chart from LLC Attorney lists every luxurious brand under the LVMH umbrella in one gorgeous chart.

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LVMH’s chairman and CEO, Bernard Arnault, is the richest person in the world as of 2024 with a net worth of $223.4 billion at the time of this writing. In 1987, it was his idea to form the LVMH merger and he has been acquiring luxury brands from around the world ever since.

Their list of brands is beyond impressive. Nearly every name in the list is a world-renowned and well-known luxury brand. Christian Dior, Givenchy, Marc Jacobs, Fendi; the list reads like a who’s who of the luxury world. We were actually surprising to learn that some of these are owned by LVMH:

  • Fendi (Luxury goods and fashion)
  • Emilio Pucci (Fashion and leather goods)
  • Tiffany & Co. (Watches and jewelry)
  • Bulgari (Watches and jewelry)
  • Hennessy (Wines and spirits)
  • Dom Perignon (Wines and spirits)
  • Sephora (Perfume and cosmetics)
  • Fenty Beauty by Rihanna (Perfume and cosmetics)

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Misc Visuals

How 33 Colors Got Their Names

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As both a color lover and a word origins enthusiast, I was thrilled to discover this vibrant chart called “how colors got their names” while browsing r/coolguides! It was created by Adam Aleksic who goes by @etymologynerd on Instagram and etyomology_nerd on Twitter (I still refuse to call it X). He also has a website where provides an incredible interactive world map where you can learn about how any country got its name!

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This splashy guide caught my eye at first because it reminds me of how professional colored markers are displayed at craft stores. The name origin for crimson sparked some intrigue because it states that it is from a Persian word meaning “worm-colored” in reference to how it was made. Vermillion, another red hue, means “small worm” in Latin. So how were these pigments made originally? Turns out it has nothing to do with worms but rather a scale insect called Kermes vermilio. Ancient Egyptians, Mesopotamians, Indians, Greeks, Romans, and Iranians crushed the dried bodies of these insects into a richly pigmented red dye.

Here is a fun little nugget of trivia from the comment section by pshokoohi: “Fun fact, in Pharsi, when we refer to someone as “khaki” it generally means they’re “down to earth.”” The word Khaki traces to the Persian word khak, meaning “dusty” or “earth-colored”. I would absolutely love to see another guide like this with entirely different colors! Here are a few I got curious about:

Yellow: “The word yellow is from the Old English geolu, geolwe (oblique case), meaning “yellow, and yellowish”, derived from the Proto-Germanic word gelwaz “yellow”. It has the same Indo-European base, gel-, as the words gold and yell; gʰel- means both bright and gleaming, and to cry out.”

Green: “From Middle English grene, from Old English grēne, from Proto-West Germanic *grōnī, from Proto-Germanic *grōniz, from Proto-Indo-European *gʰreh₁- (“to grow”).”

Pink: “The color pink is named after the flowers, pinks,[7] flowering plants in the genus Dianthus, and derives from the frilled edge of the flowers. The verb “to pink” dates from the 14th century and means “to decorate with a perforated or punched pattern” (possibly from German picken, “to peck”).”

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